Five Reasons You Didn’t Get the Job

unemployed, worker rights, employment lawWhether you’re an expert in your field or an unpaid intern looking for fulltime work, at some point in your professional career you will be faced with an interview. Every day countless applicants are hit with rejection and fear their time on unemployment will be endless; but if you find yourself among this crowd, there could be some solid explanations for why you didn’t land your dream job. Learn from these mistakes and grow from your experiences.

 

Arrived Late

Being late to a job interview is just like being late to a cruise; once you miss your time slot that ship has literally and figuratively sailed. Don’t waste your interviewer’s time with tardiness. You should be 10-15 minutes early for every interview you go on.

 

Bad-Mouthed Former Employer

During your interview, you will undoubtedly be faced with some complex questions that demand quick responses. Tactfully address questions like “why did you leave your last job?” with diplomatic answers you’ve prepared ahead of time. Even if your last boss was rude and constantly denied you meal breaks, talk about why you are searching for new opportunities that better suit your skills.

 

Typo-Riddled Resume

Think of your resume as the digital first impression. If your work is riddled with typos, you can bet an employer will not call you for an in-person interview. Give your resume to one or two people who can proofread it for any errors. This safeguard will only take a few minutes and could save you from punctuation pitfalls.

 

You Didn’t Seem Engaged

Would you hire someone who doesn’t give solid eye contact and is constantly yawning during the interview? Of course not! Be engaged in your interview by asking questions and following up with a handwritten thank you card. Remember, small gestures could have a big impact in separating yourself from the other job candidates.

 

You Were Discriminated Against

Before you even step foot in the building, an employer may already have a vision of what their ideal employee looks like; this usually constitutes a form of workplace discrimination. Under the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, it is illegal for an employer to discriminate against someone (applicant or employee) because of that person’s race, gender, age, and more. Sadly, this practice still happens in the job sector, but it doesn’t mean you have to become the next victim.

 

If you feel your rights in the workplace are being violated, contact an employment lawyer immediately.

 

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